2021 Call for Papers

Call for Papers Timeline
February 25, 2021: Abstract submission site opens.
April 18, 2021: Abstract submission deadline extended until Sunday.
July 10, 2021: Decision notifications sent.
July 10, 2021: Preliminary program online.
July 15, 2021: Registration opens.
August 21, 2021: Early registration deadline.

Message from the Program Chairs
Section Chairs and Section Descriptions
Preliminary Online Program
Registration
Workshops
Hotel and Travel

 

Presentation Formats

Symposia
Symposia provide the opportunity for investigators whose work has a common theme to present their findings in a single session. Each symposium proposal should include: 1) a justification that describes the contributions of each individual paper and how the studies are related, 2) abstracts for each of the individual papers being proposed, and 3) an independent discussant to provide comments on each paper and on the symposium as a whole. Symposium sessions are 90 minutes long, and the organizer will be responsible for running the session and introducing the speakers. The Program Committee encourages symposium submissions to include the presence and perspectives of individuals from diverse backgrounds, including diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, career stage, institutional affiliation, and role. With respect to role, symposium organizers should think about how to incorporate individuals who are in a position to implement research findings (e.g., a representative from a school district involved in an intervention or pilot study developed by a third party research team).

Moderated Discussion Panels
Panel sessions provide an opportunity to explore an issue beyond paper presentations. A panel proposal should be closely aligned with the conference theme and should include: 1) a moderator (who may also be the session organizer), 2) a justification that promotes the session by describing the session (and any individual abstracts if the panel format lends itself to more than a session description), 3) an outlined plan for the session that includes audience participation, and 4) proposed panelists. These panel sessions may take a variety of formats, such as a moderated discussion with 2-3 panelists, a debate, an examination of a topic from different perspectives, or case studies. We encourage panels that actively engage the audience and seek to include multiple perspectives, including researchers and practitioners. The Program Committee encourages panel submissions to include the presence and perspectives of individuals from diverse backgrounds, including diversity of race, ethnicity, gender, career stage, institutional affiliation, and role.
New this year: Panel proposal reviews will not be blinded to allow reviewers to better evaluate the perspectives and experiences brought to the panel session.


Individual Papers
Individual papers with a similar focus will be assembled into a single session by the program committee. Usually 3-4 papers are included in a session.

Posters
Presenters in the poster session will have the option of using physical or electronic display. Presenters may upload their poster presentations to the conference website to allow pre- and post-conference viewing of materials in addition to the abstract.

“In the Pipeline” Poster Session for Works in Progress
Introduced for the Spring 2020 Conference, the SREE 2021 conference will include a new type of session: in-the-pipeline posters for work in progress. This session allows presenters to share studies that are underway but do not yet have findings to report. Studies presented in these posters may also have interim findings that are not ready for presentation in a paper. The purpose of this session is to increase the SREE community’s awareness of research projects in the pipeline, facilitate networking among researchers conducting or contemplating similar work, and provide useful feedback to the presenters that can inform their work.

Workshops
In conjunction with the SREE 2021 Conference, SREE will be offering in-depth workshops on a variety of topics on Sunday, September 26, 2021. If you are interested in organizing and running one of these workshops, please submit a proposal. The proposal should include:

1. Contact name and email address;
2. Workshop Title;
3. Presenters;
4. Proposed length of time (2-5 hours);
5. Description of the session;
6. Significance of the topic; and
7. Target Audience.

Workshop proposals will be reviewed by the SREE conference committee. Applicants will be notified by June 15, 2021. Each workshop selected for inclusion in the conference is allocated a $1000 honorarium for its presenters' work in preparing and presenting the session.

These workshops provide a valuable opportunity for professional development and knowledge transfer between members of the SREE community. Proposals are due April 15, 2021.

 

SREE encourages diversity in its membership and in Society activities. The Spring 2020 Program Committee welcomes submissions across the conference program that include the presence and perspectives of individuals from diverse backgrounds, including those associated with race, ethnicity, gender, career stage, institutional affiliation and role.

 

Paper Types and Review Criteria

For the 2021 conference, SREE will accept proposals for three types of studies: cause-and-effect; research methods; and strategies and approaches for using evidence from cause-and-effect studies. This last category is aimed at encouraging the development of practices that connect rigorous research with on-the-ground practice in education settings. The review criteria for these three proposal types differ as noted below.

Review Criteria for Cause-and-Effect Studies

Thematic Connection (for Moderated Discussion Panels only)
To what extent does the proposal explicitly address the conference theme?

Theoretical Criterion
To what extent does the proposal extend understanding of key phenomena or improve our ability to identify cause-and-effect relationships in education?

Pragmatic Criteria
To what extent does the proposal address an important problem of policy or practice in education?

To what extent does the proposal have the potential to inform critical decisions about educational policy or practice?

Methodological Criteria
Has the proposal employed elements of research design that attempt to eliminate potential sources of bias that may interfere with valid cause-and-effect conclusions?

Does the proposal include valid and reliable measures of key variables and outcomes?

Does the proposal clearly articulate a population of interest and discuss how the sample represents this population?

Review Criteria for Studies of Research Methods

Thematic Connection (for Moderated Discussion Panels only)
Does the proposal explicitly address the conference theme?

Theoretical Criterion
Is the problem under study clearly situated in a historical context with attention paid to prior methodological research?

Does the proposal improve our ability to identify cause-and-effect relationships in education or improve our ability to apply results from cause-and-effect studies to questions of education policy and practice?

Pragmatic Criteria
To what extent is there a specifically articulated and important problem in education that this work is trying to solve?

To what extent do the methods provided appear promising in their capacity to be implemented by education researchers conducting cause-and-effect studies?

Methodological Criteria
To what extent are the proposed methods clearly articulated (versus being too vague or overly complicated)?

If the proposal provides mathematical derivations, do they appear clear and correct?

If the proposal uses real or simulated data, is enough detail provided regarding the data or simulation design, and is this design adequate for providing evidence that the proposed methods are an improvement over existing methods?

Review Criteria for Proposals of Strategies and Approaches for Using Evidence from Cause-and-Effect Studies

Thematic Connection (for Moderated Discussion Panels)
To what extent does the panel explicitly address the conference theme?

Theoretical Criterion
To what extent does the proposal extend understanding of key phenomena related to use of evidence from cause-and-effect studies in education?

Pragmatic Criteria
To what extent does the proposal address an important problem of policy or practice in education?

To what extent does the proposal have the potential to inform critical decisions about educational policy or practice?

For Empirical Papers: Methodological Criteria
To what extent does the proposal employ a research design appropriate to the question?

Does the proposal include valid and reliable measures of key variables?

Does the proposal clearly discuss the conditions under which the strategies or approaches might be useful in other samples or populations (or the contexts in which more research is needed)?

Submission Procedures:

Individual papers and posters

Proposals for individual papers and posters should be submitted as a structured abstract, as outlined in the following paragraph. The abstract is limited to 1000 words, excluding references, tables, and figures.

We recommend that abstracts be organized using the following headings*:

  • Background/Context: Description of prior research on the subject and/or its intellectual context and/or its policy context.
  • Purpose/Objective/Research Question: Description of the focus of the research, including hypotheses.
  • Setting: Specific description of where the research took place.
  • Population/Participants/Subjects: Who, how many, key features or characteristics.
  • Intervention/Program/Practice: Specific description of the intervention, including key components of how it was implemented or administered, and its duration.
  • Research Design: Specific description of the research design, including strategies for eliminating sources of bias.
  • Data Collection and Analysis: Description of methods used in collecting and analyzing data.
  • Findings/Results: Description of main findings with specific details.
  • Conclusions: Description of conclusions limitations, and recommendations of authors.


“In the Pipeline” Poster Session for Works in Progress

Proposals for the works-in-progress poster session should be submitted as a structured abstract, as outlined in the following paragraph. The abstract is limited to 1000 words, excluding references, tables, and figures.

We recommend that abstracts be organized using the following headings*:

 

  • Background/Context: Description of prior research on the subject and/or its intellectual context and/or its policy context.
  • Purpose/Objective/Research Question: Description of the focus of the research, including hypotheses.
  • Setting: Specific description of where the research is taking place.
  • Population/Participants/Subjects: Who, how many, key features or characteristics.
  • Intervention/Program/Practice: Specific description of the intervention, including key components of how it is or will be implemented or administered.
  • Research Design: Specific description of the research design, including strategies for eliminating sources of bias.
  • Data Collection and Analysis: Description of methods that will be used in collecting and analyzing data.
  • (Optional) Preliminary findings.

Abstracts for proposals that are not studies of cause-and-effect do not necessarily need to include all recommended headings.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Symposia and Moderated Discussion Panels

Each element of a symposium or panel submission will be subject to the same limit of 1000 words per abstract. In each case, the space limit does not include references, tables, or figures. For example, a symposium with 3 papers would have a word limit of 3500 (1000 x 3 plus 500). A standard panel with a moderator and 3 panelists would have a word limit of 3500 (1000 x 3 plus 500), but a non-standard panel might not have individual elements and simply require a panel justification (session description). In each case, the space limit does not include references, tables, or figures.

*Note: The headings above were derived from Mosteller, Nave & Miech (2004), Why We Need A Structured Abstract in Education Research. Educational Researcher 30(1), 29-34.
https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ727552.pdf


Conference Program Limit

An individual may be a presenting author (in a symposium, paper session, or poster) or panel participant (moderator or panelist) no more than twice in the conference program. This restriction does not include serving as a symposium organizer, symposium discussant, panel organizer, paper session chair, or workshop presenter. The presenting author must be identified in the abstract submission process for each paper or poster and will be designated with an asterisk in the conference program.